WETHERSFIELD: Wethersfield Auxiliary Hospital, Essex

WETHERSFIELD AUXILIARY HOSPITAL

Wethersfield, Essex.

The exact location of the Auxiliary Hospital in Wethersfield, Essex is proving to be rather puzzling and any reader’s insight into this subject will be greatly appreciated.

A 1915 War Office List of Essex V.A.D. Hospitals (under Eastern Command), refers to the Auxiliary Hospital as “Wethersfield Place”.

Wethersfield Place, Wethersfield,Essex. © Bikeboy, Geography. Org. UK.

Wethersfield Place, Wethersfield,Essex. © Bikeboy, Geography. Org. UK.


HOWEVER … from information gleaned from British Red Cross Society-held volunteer service cards, the Hospital was also referred to as the ‘Wethersfield House Hospital’; the ‘Wethersfield V.A.D. Hospital’; and the ‘Wethersfield Red Cross Hospital’.

Articles within the Chelmsford Chronicle (Friday 13 November 1914 and 08 January 1915) refer to “a house”.

“ … thank all who are so generously making contributions both in money and kind for the upkeep of the hospital, and especially Mr. Simmons, who is giving the house rent free.”  (Friday 13 November 1914)

“A hospital for wounded soldiers had been established in Wethersfield in a house lent gratis by Mr. Symonds …”.  (Friday 08 January 1915)


The Green and The Red Lion Inn, Wethersfield, Essex. pu1916. Courtesy of Heather Anne Johnson.

The Green & The Red Lion Inn, Wethersfield, Essex. pu1916. Courtesy of Heather Anne Johnson.


ADDITIONALLY … local Wethersfield sources have suggested that the Wethersfield Hospital was located in the former Red Lion pub property, which is nearly opposite the parish church.     There is a story that an itinerant Wethersfield chap used to sing songs under the pub’s windows.   Soldiers would heat up coins on the stove and throw them out at him.  When the chap picked them up the language was rumoured to be quite “colourful”!

BUT … wherever the Hospital was situated, it appears to have been operational from 5 November 1914 until 5 July 1915.


Friday 13 November 1914*, Chelmsford Chronicle [sic]:

WETHERSFIELD.  RED CROSS HOSPITAL.—The first consignment of wounded, consisting of ten Belgian soldiers, have arrived from Colchester at the Wethersfield Red Cross Hospital.  Dr. Elrington is attending tee cases, with Miss Hart as sister-in-charge, under whom the following members of the V. A. Detachment are working, viz., Miss Brunwin, Miss M. Gordon, Miss Law, Nurse Leybourne, Mrs. Nottage, Mrs. Pawsey, Miss Pick, Mrs. Frank Smith, and Miss Wallace.  Lady Flannery, Mrs. Gordon, and Mrs. Elrington thank all who are so generously making contributions both in money and kin for the upkeep of the hospital, and especially Mr. Simmons, who is giving the house rent free.”


Friday 08 January 1915, Chelmsford Chronicle [sic]:

 ‘MANORIAL SUPPER AT WETHERSFIELD, under ‘THE WAR AND ITS CONSQUENCES’ [sic]:

A hospital for wounded soldiers had been established in Wethersfield in a house lent gratis by Mr. Symonds, under the management of Dr. Elrington and a committee of ladies.   Ladies of the village were doing the nursing and work in the hospital gratuitously, and the floors were scrubbed without payment, all wishing to help in the national duty in assisting those who were defending our homes.”

(FULL 08 JANUARY 1915 ARTICLE TRANSCRIBED AT END OF THE CHAPTER)


Saturday 06 March 1915Essex Newsman [sic]:

WETHERSFIELD.  A SUCCESSFUL VARIETY ENTERTAINMENT was given in the Schoolroom, Blackmore End, in aid of the Wethersfield Red Cross Hospital.  Warm thanks are due to the following ladies and gentlemen who contributed the excellent programme of acting and songs, and to all those who so kindly sent donations of money to the funds : Miss Olive Stockbridge, Miss Eva Halls, the Misses Greene, Mr. Hiscock, Mr. T. Neilson, and Mr. W. Parmenter.  By sale of tickets and donations £19 2s. 4d. was realised, and the expenses being, royalties on plays £3 12s. 2d. and working expenses £3 9s. 2d., there remained a balance for the Wethersfield Red Cross Hospital of £12 1s.”


Wethersfield Green, Essex: Red Lion Inn arrowed. Courtesy of Heather Anne Johnson.

Wethersfield Green, Essex: Red Lion Inn arrowed. Courtesy of Heather Anne Johnson.



LIST OF PEOPLE KNOWN TO HAVE WORKED AT WETHERSFIELD AUXILIARY HOSPITAL:  There is no doubt that many people who assisted in the running of this establishment will never be discovered within records and, thus, they remain un-named. If a British Red Cross-held Service Card exists for a person, a link is displayed at an individual’s profile [dates in () refer to length of service at Belle Vue Red Cross Hospital]:

BRUNOIUS, Frances – see SCHWIER.

BRUNWIN, Miss Winifred May (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. Masseuse.  Mentioned 13 November 1914* Also worked at Braintree V.A.D. Hospital and Shalford Working Party)

ELRINGTON, Dr. Nicholas (Medical Officer.  Mentioned 13 November 1914*)

ELRINGTON, Mrs. Ethel ((5.11.1914-5.7.1915. Quartermaster.  Mentioned 13 November 1914*)

FLANNERY, Lady Edith May Emma (nee Jenkyn)

GORDON, Mrs. Edith (nee Rouse) (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. Commandant)

GORDON, Miss Charlotte Alice “Muriel” (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. Nursing.  Also worked at Middlesex War Hospital at Clacton-on-Sea)

GREENE, Miss Evelyn May (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. Washing up etc)

GREENE, Miss Gladys Mary (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. Washing up etc)

HALLS, Miss Emily Vera (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. V.A.D. Nurse)

HART, Miss  (Trained Nurse/Sister-in-Charge. Mentioned 13 November 1914*)

LAW, Miss Florence Mary (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. V.A.D. Nurse. Mentioned 13 November 1914*)

LAWRENCE, Miss May Ives (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. V.A.D. Nurse.  Also worked at Braintree V.A.D. Hospital)

LEYBOURNE, Nurse Leybourne (Trained Nurse. Mentioned 13 November 1914*)

LINSELL, Miss Agnes Mary (2.1914-7.1915. Helping with dressings/sweeping & dusting)

NOTTAGE, Mrs. Harriet “Eva” nee Edwards (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. Nursing – 13 November 1914*)

PAWSEY, Mrs. (?5.11.1914-5.7.1915. V.A.D. Nurse? Mentioned 13 November 1914*)

PICK, Miss Constantia Ellen (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. V.A.D. Nurse.  Mentioned 13 November 1914* Also worked at Middlesex War Hospital, Clacton and Earls Colne)

SCHWIER, Mrs. Frances nee Brunoius (5.11.1914-5.7.1915.Canteen Manageress)

SIMMONS/SYMONDS, Mr. (Donor)

SMITH, Mrs. Frank (Mentioned 13 November 1914*)

WALLACE, Miss Bertha (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. V.A.D. Nurse.  Mentioned 13 November 1914*)



PROFILES

BRUNWIN, Miss Winifred May (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. Masseuse.  Mentioned 13 November 1914* Also worked at Braintree V.A.D. Hospital and Shalford Working Party.  Mother Agnes worked for the Shalford Working Party. )

Born 1894 Shalford, Essex.  Daughter of South Hanningfield-born Farmer & Maltster Thomas George and his Warwickshire-born wife Agnes Emma.

1901 Census:      Sheering Hall, Shalford, Essex.  With parents; a sister; a Visitor; a Cook & Housemaid.

1911 Census:      Sheering Hall, Shalford, Essex.  With parents; a sister; a Visitor; a Cook & Gen.  Servant.

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=wethersfield+essex&id=30539&first=true

ADDRESS: Sherne Hall, Braintree; COUNTY: Essex; HOSPITAL: VAD Hospital, Braintree; PREVIOUS ENGAGEMENT: Wethersfield & Braintree V.A.D. hospitals; RANK AT ENGAGEMENT: Masseuse; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 11/1916; PAY AT ENGAGEMENT: £2.10 per wk; DATE OF TERMINATION: 09/1918; WHOLE OR PART TIME: Whole time; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Nov. 1914 to July 1915 Wethersfield V.A.D. Hospital Essex – 52 Sept. 1915 to Jan 1916 Braintree V.A.D. Hospital Nov 1916 to Sept. 1918. Masseuse at 2nd. General Eastern, Brighton and Royal Sussex County Hospital Brighton; COMMISSION: Essex.

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=braintree&page=2&id=30540

ADDRESS: Sheering Hall, Shalford, Braintree; SERVICE FROM: 10/1914; SERVICE TO: 03/1919; PREVIOUS ENGAGEMENT: Fortnightly for 6 months yearly. From Oct 1914 to March 1919; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: Shalford Working Party, Soldiers Comforts France; WHOLE OR PART TIME: 2 hours; COMMISSION: Essex.

1917, 22 June:    Physiotherapy and Masseuse Register: Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine Certificate No. 4345. Certificate Holder “Brunwin, Winifred May. Sherne House, Withdean Rd, Brighton.  Perm. Sherne Hall, Braintree Essex.”

1920-1921:          Physiotherapy and Masseuse Register: “Reg. No. 2386. Brunwin, Winifred May.  Sherne Hall, Braintree”.   Additional Qualifications Registered: “M.E.”.

1920-1928:          Physiotherapy and Masseuse Register: Medical Electricity Register: “Reg. No. 575”.

1924, 2Q:             Married Andrew J. Goodchild in the Braintree District.

1973, 2 May:       Winifred May Goodchild “of Hazeldene Shalford Braintree Essex” died.


ELRINGTON, Dr. Nicholas (Medical Officer. Surgeon. Mentioned 13 November 1914*)   

Born 1865 Great Saling, Essex.  Son of Irish parents – Vicar Thomas William Elrington and Isabella (nee Fenwick)

1871 Census:      Great Saling, Essex.  With parents; three sisters; 1 brother; and two servants.

1881 Census:      Felstead Grammar School. Scholar.

1891 Census:      33 Oakley Street, Chelsea.  Student in Medicine.  Visitor at the Acton family home.

1894, 3Q:             Married Ethel M. Malcolm.  Marriage registered in the Halstead District.

1901 Census:      The Hall, Wethersfield. Surgeon. With wife” Edith M.”; a daughter; three sons; Scottish father-in-law; and three servants.

1911 Census:      The Hall, Westhersfield.  Doctor …+ 3 females in the household (1911 Summary Census)

1939, June:         Nicholas Erlington’s death registered in the Willesden, Middlesex District.


ELRINGTON, Mrs. Ethel ((5.11.1914-5.7.1915. Quartermaster.  Mentioned 13 November 1914*) Wife of aforementioned Dr. Nicholas Elrington.

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=wethersfield&id=69464&forwards=true

ADDRESS: Wethersfield Hall, Braintree, Essex; COUNTY: Essex; SERVICE FROM: 05/11/1914; SERVICE TO: 05/07/1915; HOSPITAL: Wethersfield House, Braintree; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 05/11/1914; DATE OF TERMINATION: 05/07/1915; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: Took entire charge of cooking dept; WHOLE OR PART TIME: Whole; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Took charge of the cooking entirely in the Wethersfield V.A.D. Hospital between the dates named above; COMMISSION: Essex 52.


FLANNERY, Lady Edith May Emma (nee Jenkyn)  

Born 1857 Hampstead, London.  Registered 2nd Quarter.  Daughter of St. Albans-born Solicitor Osborn Jenkyn and his wife Elizabeth.

?Was the Auxiliary Hospital at Wethersfield House’?

Wethersfield Manor House. Courtesy of Heather A. Johnson.

Wethersfield Manor House. Courtesy of Heather A. Johnson.

1911 Census: The Manor House, Wethersfield, Essex.  With husband Sir James Fortescue Flannery (Civil Engineer & M.P.)  plus 1 son and 2 daughters.  + 7 servants.

“In June 1933, Wethersfield House suffered a major fire – it was caused by a fire that had been lit in the Drawing Room by 75-year-old Lady Edith Flannery, who was not feeling well.  The room was in the oldest, oak-timbered part of the Manor, known in earlier times known as Dobbins farmhouse.    About 6pm Lady Flannery was walking in the garden when smoke was seen coming from her apartments. The fire alarm bell on the roof was sounded and soon the villagers were rushing to do what they could. Cricketers left their match and raced up the hill in their flannels.  The nearest fire-engines at Bocking and Braintree were six miles away and would take some minutes to reach the now blazing West wing.

Villagers set about rescuing Sir Fortescue’s collection of silver and his valuable library of 2,000 books which they laid out on the lawn.   Ill as she was, Lady Flannery ran back into the house to retrieve the family’s valuables.     No-one was seriously hurt, although several men suffered burns.  Lady Flannery was treated for shock and, never fully recovering from the ordeal, she died in March 1936.”   (Source [2013] http://www.wethersfield-essex.co.uk not found in 2016)


GORDON, Mrs. Edith (nee Rouse) (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. Commandant)

Born 1848 Bradford, Yorkshire. Baptised on 21 July 1848 in Bradford Cathedral.  Daughter of Worsted Manufacturer (Flax Spinning company) William Rouse and his wife Sarah Dobson nee Stocks.

1851 Census:      West Lodge, Great Horton, Yorkshire. With parents; one sisters;  two brothers; and five servants.

1861 Census:      Burley House, Burley, Yorkshire.  With parents; four brothers; a Governess; and five servants.

1871 Census:      Burley House, Burley, Yorkshire.  With mother; three brothers; one sister; a visitor William Gordon (Lieut. 73rd Foot. Husband-to-be); and seven servants.

1871, 19 Apr:      Married William Gordon (born c1842 Buttar, East Indies (British Subject).

1881 Census:      Fernie Hurst, Baildon, Yorkshire. At the home of a sister & brother-in-law; with three daughters and one son; plus eight servants of the house.

1891 Census:      ?

1901 Census:      The Place, Wethersfield, Nr Braintree, Essex. With Retired Army Col. Husband William; three daughters; a niece; a cook; and two more servants.

1911 Census:      The Wethersfield Place, Nr Braintree, Essex. With Retired Army Col. Husband William; three daughters; and four servants.

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=wethersfield+place&id=86960&first=true

ADDRESS: Wethersfield Place Nr. Braintree; COUNTY: Essex; SERVICE FROM: 05/11/1914; SERVICE TO: 05/07/1915; RANK AT ENGAGEMENT: Comdt; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 05/11/1914; RANK AT TERMINATION: Comdt; DATE OF TERMINATION: 05/07/1915; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: Commandant of Wethersfield V.A.D. Hospital; WHOLE OR PART TIME: Whole; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Commandant of Wethersfield V.A.D. Hospital for the above named period. Essex 52; COMMISSION: Essex.


GORDON, Miss Charlotte Alice Muriel “Muriel” (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. Nursing.  Also worked at Middlesex War Hospital at Clacton-on-Sea)

Born 1874 London (Registered 2nd Quarter St George Hanover Square). Daughter of British Subject, East Indies-born Army Officer/Colonel William Gordon and his Yorkshire-born Edith (nee Rouse).  Daughter of Commandant Edith above.

 

1881 Census:      Fernie Hurst, Baildon, Yorkshire. At an aunt and uncle’s home; with mother; two sisters; one brother; and eight servants of the house.

1891 Census:      ?

1901 Census:      The Place, Wethersfield, Nr Braintree, Essex. With parents; two sisters; a cousin; a cook; and two more servants.

1911 Census:      The Wethersfield Place, Nr Braintree, Essex. With parents; two sisters; and 4 servants.

1965, 15 Jun:      Charlotte Alice Muriel Gordon “of Milverton Hotel, Cheltenham” died at The General Hospital, Cheltenham. 

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=wethersfield+place&id=87095&forwards=true

ADDRESS: Wethersfield Place Nr. Braintree; COUNTY: Essex; HOSPITAL: Wethersfield House, Braintree; RANK AT ENGAGEMENT: Received; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 01/1918; PAY AT ENGAGEMENT: £20 per annum for 1 year; DATE OF TERMINATION: 01/1919; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: Nursing Entirely; WHOLE OR PART TIME: Whole; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Nov 5th.1914 to July 5th.1915 Nursing at Wethersfield V.A.D. Hospital, Essex 52. Nov.1915 to Jan. 1919 Nursing at the Middlesex War Hospital, Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, almost continuously & a short time at the Chelmsford Military Hospital. Came home owing to illness occasioned by a fall in Hospital; COMMISSION: Essex.


GREENE, Miss Evelyn May (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. Washing up etc)

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=wethersfield&id=89788&forwards=true

ADDRESS: Park Side Wethersfield; COUNTY: Essex; SERVICE FROM: 11/1914; SERVICE TO: 07/1915; HOSPITAL: Wethersfield House, Braintree; PREVIOUS ENGAGEMENT: Essex – 52; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: When Hospital was opened Nov 5th 1914; PAY AT ENGAGEMENT: None; DATE OF TERMINATION: until it was closed July 5th 1915; PAY AT TERMINATION: None; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: Washing up etc at Wethersfield V.A.D. Hospital; WHOLE OR PART TIME: Part time; COMMISSION: Essex.


GREENE, Miss Gladys Mary (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. Washing up etc)

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=wethersfield&id=89792&forwards=true

ADDRESS: Park Side, Wethersfield; COUNTY: Essex; SERVICE FROM: 11/1914; SERVICE TO: 07/1915; PREVIOUS ENGAGEMENT: Essex 52; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: when hospital was opened Nov 5th 1914; DATE OF TERMINATION: until it closed July 5th 1915; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: washing up & various other jobs; WHOLE OR PART TIME: part time; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Wethersfield V.A.D. Hspl; COMMISSION: Essex.


HALLS, Miss Emily Vera (5.11.1914-3.7.1915. V.A.D. Nurse at Wethersfield.  )

Born 1893 Blackmore End, Wethersfield, Essex.  Daughter of London-born Farmer Frank Herbert Halls and his Blackmore End-born wife Mary Ann S. (nee Brand).

1901 Census:      Summers Hall, Wethersfield.  “Emily V.”  With parents; sister Eva M.; Aunt Marian Halls; and one servant.

1911 Census:      Summers Hall, Wethersfield.  “Vera E.”  With parents; sister Eva M.; Aunt Marian Halls; and one servant.

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=braintree&id=94336&forwards=true

FORENAME: Emily Vera; SURNAME: Halls; ADDRESS: Summers Hall, Wethersfield, Nr Braintree; PREVIOUS ENGAGEMENT: 05.11.1914 – 05. 07.1915. V.A.D. Nurse in Red X Hospital – 4 days a week Voluntary Essex 52 P.T.O; RANK AT ENGAGEMENT: Member; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 01/09/1918; PAY AT ENGAGEMENT: £20 per annum; RANK AT TERMINATION: Member; DATE OF TERMINATION: 03/12/1918; PAY AT TERMINATION: £20 per annum; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: V.A.D. Nurse in Middlesex War Hospital Clacton; WHOLE OR PART TIME: Whole time; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: 26.10.1915 – 11.11.1916 – V.A.D. Nurse in France 26th General Hospital. Pay £20 per annum & allowance 03.1917 – 07.1918 Work in Munition Factory Average pay about 30/- a week; COMMISSION: Essex

(26.10.1915-10.11.1918. J.W. V.A.D. Nurse. Middlesex Military Hospital, Clacton-on-Sea and France)

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=braintree&id=94335&forwards=true

FORENAME: Vera; SURNAME: Halls; ADDRESS: Summers Hall, Wethersfield, Nr Braintree, Essex; COUNTY: Essex; AGE WHEN ENGAGED: 23; SERVICE FROM: 26/10/1915; SERVICE TO: 10/11/1918; PREVIOUS ENGAGEMENT: P.T.O; RANK AT ENGAGEMENT: Nurse; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 26/10/1915; PAY AT ENGAGEMENT: With; DATE OF TERMINATION: 10/11/1918; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: France; DEPARTMENT: J.W.V.A.D; COMMISSION: Essex 52.


HART, Miss (Trained Nurse/Sister-in-Charge. Mentioned 13 November 1914*)


LAW, Miss Florence Mary (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. V.A.D. Nurse. Mentioned 13 November 1914* Mother was Organiser of Shalford Working Party)

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=wethersfield&id=130374&forwards=true

ADDRESS: The Hall, Wethersfield, nr Braintree; SERVICE FROM: 00/11/1914; SERVICE TO: 00/03/1918; HOSPITAL: Wethersfield House, Braintree; PREVIOUS ENGAGEMENT: 4 nights Member. Shalford Working Party 2 hours fortnightly for winter months (6) 1914 – 1915; RANK AT ENGAGEMENT: Member; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 04/11/1914; RANK AT TERMINATION: Essex 52; DATE OF TERMINATION: 04/07/1915; PAY AT TERMINATION: Voluntary; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: Nursing; WHOLE OR PART TIME: 8 days; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Rec’d 3 jul 1919 Wethersfield VAD hospital Shalford Work Depot; COMMISSION: Essex.


LAWRENCE, Miss May Ives (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. V.A.D. Nurse.  Also worked at Braintree V.A.D. Hospital)

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=wethersfield&id=130721&forwards=true

ADDRESS: Blackmore End, Wethersfield, Nr. Braintree; COUNTY: Essex; RANK AT ENGAGEMENT: Member; PAY AT ENGAGEMENT: £20; RANK AT TERMINATION: Member; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: Entirely Nursing; WHOLE OR PART TIME: Whole; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Nov. 5th 1914 to July 5th 1915 Nursing at Wethersfield V.A.D. Hospital Essex 52 Sept. 1915 to Sept 1916 V.A.D. Hospital, Highgate, London Oct 1916 to Nov 1917 Bristol General Hospital (Broadmead) Dec. 1917 to March 1919 28 General Hospital Solonika Still Serving (Whole time in all Hospitals).

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=braintree&page=6&id=130720&forwards=true

ADDRESS: Blackmore End, Braintree; COUNTY: Essex; AGE WHEN ENGAGED: 22; SERVICE FROM: 12/03/1917; SERVICE TO: 19/04/1919; PREVIOUS ENGAGEMENT: P.T.O; RANK AT ENGAGEMENT: Nurse; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 12/03/1917; PAY AT ENGAGEMENT: With; DATE OF TERMINATION: 19/04/1919; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: 12.3.17 – 2nd. South. Gen.Mil Hospital Braintree Trans 20.4.1918 – Salonica; DEPARTMENT: J.W.V.A.D; COMMISSION: Essex 52; HONOURS AWARDED: 2 Scarlet stripes 4.4.19.


LEYBOURNE, Nurse Leybourne (Trained Nurse. Mentioned 13 November 1914*)  ?


LINSELL, Miss Agnes Mary (2.1914-7.1915. Helping with dressings/sweeping & dusting)

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=wethersfield&id=135047&forwards=true

ADDRESS: Finchingfield Braintree; SERVICE FROM: 02/1915; SERVICE TO: 10/1916; HOSPITAL: Wethersfield House, Braintree; Auxiliary Hospital, Earls Colne; RANK AT ENGAGEMENT: V.A.D. Nurse; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 02/1915; DATE OF TERMINATION: 10/1916; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: Sweeping & Dusting & Helping with Dressings; WHOLE OR PART TIME: Full time for twelve weeks; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Essex 42 Wethersfield Red Cross Hospital Feb to July 1915 Earls Colne R. C. Hospital June to Oct 1916; COMMISSION: Essex.


NOTTAGE, Mrs. Harriet “Eva” nee Edwards (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. Nursing. Mentioned 13 November 1914*)

Born 1883 Wethersfield, Essex.  Registered 2nd Q.   Daughter of Garboldisham-Norfolk-born Farmer and Grocer Frederick Woods and his wife Barbara Letitia.

Mrs. Harriet Eva Nottage “Eva” (nee Edwards) © Maggie Salisbury.

Mrs. Harriet Eva Nottage “Eva” (nee Edwards) Courtesy/© of Maggie Salisbury.

1891 Census:      94 High Street, Wethersfield, Essex. With parents and 7 siblings. + 1 servant.

1901 Census:      ?

1910:                   Married Walter Nottage.

1911 Census:       Brook Farm, Wethersfield, Essex. With farmer husband Walter.

1970:                   Harriet Eva Nottage died (in Braintree Registration District).

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=wethersfield&page=2&id=161971

FORENAME: Eva; SURNAME: Nottage; ADDRESS: The Brook Farm. Wethersfield, Braintree; COUNTY: Essex; SERVICE FROM: 05/11/1914; SERVICE TO: 05/07/1915; HOSPITAL: Wethersfield House, Braintree; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 05/11/1914; DATE OF TERMINATION: 05/07/1915; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: Entirely Nursing; WHOLE OR PART TIME: Whole; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: nursed in V.A.D. Hospital at Wethersfield. between the above named dates; Essex – 52. COMMISSION: Essex.


PAWSEY, Mrs. (?5.11.1914-5.7.1915. V.A.D. Nurse? Mentioned 13 November 1914*)

This is probably MRS. ELIZA ANN PAWSEY (nee Baxter) Born 1845 Whepstead, near Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk. Reg. 3rd Q.  N.B. No volunteer card has been discovered for Mrs. Pawsey.

Daughter of Bury St. Edmunds-born Grocer John Baxter and his wife Eliza.

1881 Census:  Hawks Leys Cottage, Brockley, Suffolk.  With Ag. Lab. Husband & 7 children.

1891 Census:  The Street, Cavenham, Mildenhall, Suffolk.  With Ag. Lab. Husband & 6 children.

1901 Census:  Carter’s Farm, Colne Engaine, Essex.  With farmer husband & 4 children.

1911 Census:  Greenstead Green , Halstead, Essex.  With Farm Stockman husband & 3 children.


PICK, Miss Constantia Ellen (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. V.A.D. Nurse.  Mentioned 13 November 1914* Also worked at Middlesex War Hospital, Clacton and Earls Colne) 

Born 1872 Thetford, Lincolnshire.   Birth registered 3rd Q.  Daughter of Lincolnshire-born Farmer Robert Pick and his wife Ellen.

1891 Census:  Shelford, Lincolnshire.  With Farmer father, mother & 5 siblings.  + 1 servant.

1901 Census:  Manor Farm, Pampisford, Cambridgeshire.  With parents, brother, sister & nephew. + servant.

1911 Census:  Parks Farm, Wethersfield, Essex.  With parents, brother & niece.  +  2 servants. Occupation: Farmer’s daughter.

1960, 23 Oct:      Constantia “of Greenmeads, Wratting Road, Haverhill, Suffolk” died.  She never married.

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=wethersfield&id=238724&forwards=true

ADDRESS: Bakers Farm, Wethersfield; COUNTY: Essex; SERVICE FROM: 05/11/1914; SERVICE TO: 01/1918; HOSPITAL: Wethersfield House, Braintree; Auxiliary Hospital, Earls Colne; RANK AT ENGAGEMENT: VAD Nurse; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 05/11/1914; PAY AT ENGAGEMENT: None; RANK AT TERMINATION: Essex-52; DATE OF TERMINATION: 01/1918; PAY AT TERMINATION: None; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: Entirely Nursing; WHOLE OR PART TIME: whole time; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Wethersfield V.A.D. Hospital dating from November 5th 1914 to July 5th 1915 Middlesex War Hospital, Clacton, Essex Augt & Sept 1915 = 3 weeks Earls Colne V.A.D. Hospital Nov 1915 to Jan 1918 = 9 months with occasional intervals for Home Duties; COMMISSION: Essex 52; HONOURS AWARDED: 5 years Service Badge & Certificate for Service with V.A.D. Detachment.

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=wethersfield&id=238723&forwards=true

FORENAME: Constance; SURNAME: Pick; ADDRESS: Bakers Farm, Wethersfield, Braintree, Essex; COUNTY: Essex; SERVICE FROM: 28/11/1915; SERVICE TO: 18/01/1918; HOSPITAL: Auxiliary Hospital, Earls Colne; RANK AT ENGAGEMENT: Nursing Member; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 28/11/1915; PAY AT ENGAGEMENT: Nil; RANK AT TERMINATION: Nursing Member; DATE OF TERMINATION: 18/01/1918; PAY AT TERMINATION: Nil; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: Nursing at Red X HP, Earls Colne; WHOLE OR PART TIME: 1050 part time; COMMISSION: Essex.


SCHWIER, Mrs. Frances nee Brunoius (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. Canteen Manageress)

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=wethersfield&id=184693&forwards=true

ADDRESS: Tews, Little Sampford, Nr. Braintree; COUNTY: Essex; HOSPITAL: Wethersfield House, Braintree; PREVIOUS ENGAGEMENT: Wethersfield VAD Hospital. Hylands Chelmsford (Essex – 52); RANK AT ENGAGEMENT: Canteen Manageress; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 01/01/1917; PAY AT ENGAGEMENT: £3 per wk; RANK AT TERMINATION Canteen Manageress; DATE OF TERMINATION: 01/01/1919; PAY AT TERMINATION: £3 per wk; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: Cater for & superintend Munition factory Canteen; WHOLE OR PART TIME: Whole time; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Nov 5th. 1914 – July 5th. 1915. Nursing at Wethersfield V.A.D. Hospital – Essex 52. Nov 1914 to Jan 1915 Nursing at Hylands, Chelmsford as a V.A.D. Contracted Septic Poisoning and was discharged from Detachment with partially disabled right hand. Awarded Silver Discharge Badge. (Shalford Work Depot 2 hours fortnightly – 6 months yearly Oct. 14 – Mar. 19) Jan. 1917 to Jan 1919. Canteen Manager at the Crittall Man. Co. Braintree In Surname “(formerly Miss E, Brunoiurs.)” is followed in pencil by “Brunoiurs?”; COMMISSION: Essex.


SMITH, Mrs. Frank (?5.11.1914-5.7.1915? Mentioned 13 November 1914*)

This is probably MRS. EMILY SMITH.  Born c1862 Ipswich, Suffolk.   N.B. No volunteer service card has been discovered for Mrs. Frank Smith.

1891 Census:  Rayne Road, Bocking, Essex.  With Braintree-born Board Schoolmaster husband Frank and one son.

1901 Census:  22 Albert Road, Braintree, Essex. With Schoolmaster husband and three sons.

1911 Census:  46 Albert Road, Braintree, Essex.  With Elementary Schoolteacher husband Frank and two sons.


SIMMONS/SYMONDS, Mr. (Donor. Mentioned in newspaper articles)

This is probably Butcher Henry/Harry Simmons who was born in 1861 at Finchingfield, Essex.  Harry was the grandson of Rougham/Suffolk-born “Butcher & Beer House Keeper” Abraham Simmons and his Writtle-born wife Sarah (nee Sutton) – Harry may possibly have been the son of daughter Ellen Simmons.

1861 Census:      Duck End, Finchingfield. “Grandson, 3 months”.  With Pork Butcher Grandfather;  Grandmother; and other Simmons family members.  Ellen is the eldest daughter, aged 16.

1871 Census:      ‘The Gate’, Gt. Bardfield, Essex. “Grandson, 10”.  With Butcher/Beer House Keeper Grandfather; Grandmother; and other Simmons family members.

1881 Census:      ?

1884?:                   Married Elizabeth/Lizzy Mary (?Ashby), Braintree District.

1891 Census:      Silver Street, Wethersfield, Essex.  Occupation Butcher. With wife; sons;  a daughter; and one servant.

1901 Census:      Silver Street, Wethersfield, Essex.  Occupation: Butcher. With wife; sons Alfred & Bertie; and daughters Louisa & Grace.

1911 Census:      The Village, Wethersfield, Essex.  Occupation: Butcher. With wife; sons Alfred, Bertie & Jasby; and daughters Louisa & Grace.

1915:                     The electoral register of 1915 (the year a “Mr. Symonds” is mentioned in an afore-shown] Chelmsford Chronicle article) shows a “Henry Simmons” as a resident in the Wethersfield village and his qualifications are ‘residence’ and ‘occupation’.   This electoral register also lists Henry’s wife Elizabeth Mary and two others Alfred (absent – naval or military) and Bertram.

Friday 13 November 1914, Chelmsford Chronicle [sic]:

“ … thank all who are so generously making contributions both in money and kind for the upkeep of the hospital, and especially Mr. Simmons, who is giving the house rent free.” 

Friday 08 January 1915, Chelmsford Chronicle [sic]:

“A hospital for wounded soldiers had been established in Wethersfield in a house lent gratis by Mr. Symonds ….” 

Saturday 13 May 1916, Essex Newsman [sic]:

BRAINTREE RURAL.  Mr. H. Simmons, butcher, Wethersfield, applied for his two sons, who were slaughterman, one of whom was given conditional exemption.”

1919:                     one “Harry Simmons” is listed in the electoral register.   His qualification is ownership of a freehold house and land in ‘The Village, Wethersfield’.    

1931, 26.02:        Harry died.  (Death registered in the Braintree District).  Buried Wethersfield Parish Church.


WALLACE, Miss Bertha (5.11.1914-5.7.1915. V.A.D. Nurse. Also worked at Braintree V.A.D. Hospital)

Born 1880 Wethersfield.  Daughter of farmer King Wallace & wife Eliza, of Wright’s Farm, Wethersfield.

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=wethersfield&id=216232&forwards=true

ADDRESS: Wrights Farm, Wethersfield, Braintree; SERVICE FROM: 11/1914; SERVICE TO: 01/1916; HOSPITAL: Wethersfield House, Braintree; VAD Hospital, Braintree; PREVIOUS ENGAGEMENT: Nursed in Wethersfield V.A.D. Hospital from Nov 5th 1914 to July 5th 1915 & 2 weeks in Braintree V.A.D. Hospital in Jan 1916. (Essex- 52); RANK AT ENGAGEMENT: Member; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 05/11/1914; PAY AT ENGAGEMENT: None; DATE OF TERMINATION: 05/07/1915; PAY AT TERMINATION: None; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: Nursing; WHOLE OR PART TIME: Whole; COMMISSION: Essex 52.



WETHERSFIELD RESIDENTS WORKING ELSEWHERE

BRUNWIN, Mrs Agnes Emma (10.1914-3.1919. Shalford Working Party)

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=braintree&page=2&id=30571&forwards=true

ADDRESS: Sheering Hall. Shalford Braintree; SERVICE FROM: 00/10/1914; SERVICE TO: 00/03/1919; PREVIOUS ENGAGEMENT: Fortnightly for 6 months yearly – From Oct 1914 To March 1919; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: Shalford Working Party. Soldiers Comforts Fund; WHOLE OR PART TIME: 2 Hours; COMMISSION: Essex.


DOUSE, Miss Belinda Victoria (12.11.1917-7.2.1919. J.W. V.A.D. Nurse. Sutton Veny & Chatham)

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=braintree&page=3&id=63225&forwards=true

ADDRESS: The Dog Hotel, Westersfield, Braintree; COUNTY: Essex; AGE WHEN ENGAGED: 26; SERVICE FROM: 12/11/1917; SERVICE TO: 07/02/1919; PREVIOUS ENGAGEMENT: P.T.O.; RANK AT ENGAGEMENT: Nurse; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 12/11/1917; PAY AT ENGAGEMENT: With; DATE OF TERMINATION: 07/02/1919; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Sutton Veny (Military 12.11.17 Trans Chatham Military 7.1.19 7.2.19; DEPARTMENT: J.W. V.A.D.; COMMISSION: Essex R.


LAW, Mrs. Florence F. (10.1914-3.1919. Organiser Shalford Working Party, Soldiers Comforts Fund.  Daughter worked at Wethersfield Hospital)

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?fname=florence&sname=law&hosp=wethersfield+essex&id=130373&first=true

ADDRESS: The Vicarage, Shalford, Braintree; SERVICE FROM: 10/1914; SERVICE TO: 03/1919; PARTICULARS OF DUTIES: Organiser Shalford Working Party, Soldiers Comforts Fund; WHOLE OR PART TIME: 2 hours fortnightly for 6 months yearly form Oct 1914 to March 1918; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: New address (1919) Mrs. A J Law, The Hall, Wethersfield, Braintree; COMMISSION: Essex.


SPARKS, Mrs. Emily Maud (2.2.1918-15.4.1919. Cook at ‘Woodhouse’, Great Horkesley)

http://www.redcross.org.uk/About-us/Who-we-are/History-and-origin/First-World-War/Card?hosp=wethersfield+essex&id=195588&forwards=true

HOSPITAL: Woodhouse, Great Horkesley; PREVIOUS ENGAGEMENT: Joined Detachment 15.11.18; RANK AT ENGAGEMENT:  Cook; DATE OF ENGAGEMENT: 02/02/1918; PAY AT ENGAGEMENT: 16/- per week; RANK AT TERMINATION: Cook; DATE OF TERMINATION: 15/04/1919; PAY AT TERMINATION: 16/- per wk; WHOLE OR PART TIME: part time 2,194; ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Permanent address. The Dog Hotel, Wethersfield, Braintree. “Woodhouse” Hospital, Gt. Horkesley, Colchester {Previous Address} Rosedale Cottage, Green Lane. Gt Horkesley, Essex {Note on front of card}. Gone Away 4/8/21; COMMISSION: Essex.



FULL TRANSCRIPTION, as aforementioned: 8 January 1915, Chelmsford Chronicle [sic]:

MANORIAL SUPPER AT WETHERSFIELD.  SIR FORTESCUE FLANNERY ON THE WAR.  THE 50s. FACE.

On Saturday night Sir Fortescue Flannery, Bart., M.P., Lord of the Manor of Wethersfield, gave his annual supper to the farmers and tenants on the estate, and the members of the church choir, a company of 170 men from the parish sitting down to a substantial repast at the Dog Inn.  Sir Fortescue presided, supported by the Vicar of Wethersfield, the Rev. J. C. Rossiter; the churchwardens, Dr. Nicholas Elrington and Mr. John Wallace; and the farmers of the parish.  On the removal of the cloth, the Chairman submitted the toast of the King, which was loyally accorded.  A programme of songs and toasts followed, Mr. Edwards residing over the music.

Mr. Wallace proposed and Dr. Elrington seconded “The health of Sir Fortescue and Lady Flannery and the family,” which was accorded musical honours.

Sir Fortescue Flannery said it was a great pleasure for him to again meet his friends and neighbours at that festive and family gathering, and to wish them once again a prosperous New Year.  (Applause).  They could once more congratulate each other upon the continued good feeling which existed at Wethersfield.  (Hear, hear).  In no village was there a better feeling of neighbourliness and friendliness all round than existed at Wethersfield, and he hoped that would long continue.  (Hear, hear).  At one time he doubted whether they ought to have their annual supper this year, for the country was at war, and many thousands of the best and bravest of our countrymen were laying down their lives at sea and on land, for the safety of the homes in England.  There was a sadness in many hearts over friends and relatives who had gone never to return, and it seemed not altogether appropriate to hold a festive gathering.  But it was a duty to keep cheerful countenances and stout hearts, to encourage each other to be brave and helpful towards each other.  So he decided to have the annual gathering as they had had it for many years past.

PLEASANT MEMORIES.

Apart from the war and its consequences, there had been very few changes in Wethersfield during the year that had just closed; they had lost the Rev. Hay Hill, the dear old vicar, who ministered with a kindliness of heart and good feeling that had left very pleasant and grateful memories, which would endure for many years.  They had to welcome for the first time at their family gathering the new vicar, the Rev. J. C. Rossiter, whom they were glad to see, and if he would sign a good song or make a cheerful speech as his predecessor was want to do, he would be following in the broad path of tradition.  (Hear, hear).  The church choir had again ably performed their services in leading the singing at church, and there had been some very good attendances.  The prizes which he offered the lads for attendances had been won by Masters Bowtell and Swann, with 100 each (and to each of these he should give a first prize), and Master Joyce came second with 96 attendances.  The prizes would be continued for the lads in the present year.  (Applause).  He was very glad that Dr. Elrington, church-warden, was able to be present in spite of the extra call upon his time by the hospital at Wethersfield, which was now occupied by soldiers who had been wounded in the war. (Applause).  The tradesmen of Wethersfield were still flourishing and second to none.  In no village in Essex had they a better class of handicraftsmen or tradesmen.  The new entrance to the Manor House was a monument to the skill an labour of Messrs. Wicks, Gibbs, and Dee, and the result was such that the village might well be proud of it.  (Hear).  The village allotments were still going strong, and further land would be allotted to any in the parish who desire it.  Everyone in the parish took an interest in the shooting, and they had had another good year. 

THE 50s. A QUARTER LOOK.

Sir Fortescue proceeded to remark that the farmers present were looking rather sad; when he looked round at them he did not see the cheerfulness he might had expected, and the reason was that wheat was at 50s. a quarter.  Probably they had sold some of their wheat before it got to 50s. a quarter, and that was the reason they were not looking so cheerful as 50s. a quarter might expect.  (Laughter).  He thought they were in for a period of wonderful prosperity for Essex wheat-growing land.  Ten years ago, when he first came to Wethersfield, wheat was at 26s., and he ventured to prophesy it would soon be more than double that price before it began to fall back again.  The truth was that over a thousand mercantile and their vessels had been taken up by the Admiralty for national purposes or defences, and the cost of freight carrying grain to this country had gone up by leaps and bounds, and that was one reason which was reflected in an increased cost of importing, which, by reaction, had caused the present high price of wheat.  There was no chance of increasing to any extent the ships which carry grain in this country, and therefore the cost of freights would continue to be high, or even higher, and the value of wheat would follow upwards.  That was bad news for the breadwinner who was not a grower of corn, but fortunately a very large increase could take place in the value of wheat without very greatly increasing the price of the loaf, and it was to be hoped the people in Essex would benefit by the increased price of wheat to a greater extent, and so be compensated for the comparatively smaller increase in the price of the loaf.  That question could be safely left with the farmers, who never had been accused of want of sympathy with those who were concerned to made their livelihood with them. 

THE WAR AND ITS CONSEQUENCES.

A hospital for wounded soldiers had been established at Wethersfield in a house lent gratis by Mr. Symonds, under the management of Dr. Elrington and a committee of ladiesLadies of the village were doing the nursing and work of the hospital gratuitously, and the floors were scrubbed without payment, all wishing to help in the national duty of assisting those who were defending our homes.  Belgian refugees were being supported by contributions as small as one penny per week from cottages, so that those were now in comfort, and safety who had been driven from their homes by the barbarity of the most barbarous foe that had ever disgraced the annals of warfare. (Hear, hear).  We were now engaged in a war which was the largest, the most important, and the most tenacious that the world had ever seen.  One result of an engagement in this war had been to bring all classes of people together in  way they had never been brought before; political strife had been put aside; sectarian bitterness had been smoothed down, and people of all sections of society were now treating each other – as they ought always to have treated each other – as fellow citizens, going hand-in-hand for a common purpose, united for the defence of our hearths and homes.  (Applause).  Britain’s safety at the present time was due to the magnificent Navy; while trees and telegraph poles were being blown down in the storm, the British Navy was out in the North Sea, only a few miles away; there the sailors were enduring the cold and the hurricane in order to watch for the safety of our shores. 

KEEPING THE SEAS.

While the German Navy had been skulking from the contest they boasted they were prepared to engage in, the British Navy kept the seas.  From the date in August when war was declared the British Fleet disappeared – from the newspapers, at all events- and they had prevented the German warships from escaping to the Atlantic or other seas, and the freedom of the seas, with the passages to American, Canada, India and elsewhere had been maintained, and the fleet had enabled thousands of troops to be brought safely across the seas without the loss of a single soldier.  Wethersfield had tried to do its bit, and had sent 28 men to the Army and Navy, which was a fair number in proportion to its population.  The war was as yet only in its early stages, and there would be others in Wethersfield who would hear the call of patriotism.  Germany had been disappointed in her plan; she had not reached Paris, Calais, or Warsaw, and she was now fighting for her very existence.  With five million men Germany expected to take France and Britain by surprise, and she had another four million men training to take the field next spring.  Britain had two million men, besides those of her Allies, France and Russia, and also a splendid Navy but the great brunt of the battle still lay before us, and the day of which the Germans were boasting, when their ships came out.  The Germans had got to be driven out of France and Belgium  to their own country.  Britain was the only country that had raised two million soldiers by voluntary recruiting; no other country could have done it, and it was a magnificent testimony to the British race.  The outrages which had taken place in Belgium were as nothing compared with what would happen if the Germans should make a successful invasion of Britain. 

DEFENCE OF ENGLISH HOMES.

He believed when that invasion was attempted it would be repelled, but it was better for us that the battles should be fought in France than in England.  The battles in France were equally for the defence of English homes. As English-men, they had confidence that they were able to meet whatever happened.  (Hear, hear).  That night they had met to cheer and comfort each other; he hoped they would meet on many subsequent and similar occasions when they would be able to talk of that occasion when they met in some doubt and depression, which had then passed away, and a bright and happy future was assured.  (Applause.)  

The Rev. J. C. Rossiter, vicar, proposed “The trade and prosperity of Wethersfield,” and said his nine months’ stay in the parish had enabled him to see that they had a go-ahead lot of tradespeople there, and that prosperity might be expected.  As a parson, he was not supposed to know much about business, but there was one bit of his own business he wished to mention.  The men had found six o’clock that evening a very convenient meeting time, and they had stayed to spend several very happy hours.  On Sunday evening he was having a special service at the church for intercession for our brave sailors and soldiers. If the men did not care to come when the women were at church, or if the hour was inconvenient, he would hold a service at any hour of the day or night in order to suit them.  (Hear, hear.) 

DEFENCE OF ENGLISH HOMES.

He believed when that invasion was attempted it would be repelled, but it was better for us that the battles should be fought in France than in England.  The battles in France were equally for the defence of English homes. As English-men, they had confidence that they were able to meet whatever happened.  (Hear, hear).  That night they had met to cheer and comfort each other; he hoped they would meet on many subsequent and similar occasions when they would be able to talk of that occasion when they met in some doubt and depression, which had then passed away, and a bright and happy future was assured.  (Applause.)                                                                                           

The Rev. J. C. Rossiter, vicar, proposed “The trade and prosperity of Wethersfield,” and said his nine months’ stay in the parish had enabled him to see that they had a go-ahead lot of tradespeople there, and that prosperity might be expected.  As a parson, he was not supposed to know much about business, but there was one bit of his own business he wished to mention.  The men had found six o’clock that evening a very convenient meeting time, and they had stayed to spend several very happy hours.  On Sunday evening he was having a special service at the church for intercession for our brave sailors and soldiers. If the men did not care to come when the women were at church, or if the hour was inconvenient, he would hold a service at any hour of the day or night in order to suit them.  (Hear, hear.) 

Mr. W. Nottage, replying to the toast, said some farmers could not keep their wheat until it was worth 50s. a quarter, or they would have had some-one call to see them about it.  (Laughter.)  But wheat at 50s. a quarter did not mean that farmers was all beer and skittles; they had to pay £2 a ton more for feeding stuffs.  He had some pigs on his farm which he should be pleased to sell at 2s. a head less than it had cost to feed them.  (A voice: I will take the lot at that rate.”)  Mr. Nottage: Then I have done one good piece of business to-night.  (Laughter.) – Messrs. Green, Prime and Pawsey also replied.

Dr. Elrington proposed “Absent friends.”  He said most of those present had friends or relatives who had given their time and energy to serve their country, and some there were who had finished their service.  All hearts went out to the brave men who were facing hardships in the trenches or keeping watch at sea.

Sergt.-Major Murphey, landlord of the Bull Inn, Blackmore End, responded to the toast.  He said he offered his service when the war broke out, and they were accepted. (Applause.)  He had a son and a son-in-law at the front.  In spite of the rough and cold weather they were cheerful, and sure of winning in the end. (Applause.)  More men were wanted, and he appealed for recruits.

The proceedings closed with the singing of the National Anthem.”


NEXT: WITHAM: Witham V.A.D. Auxiliary Hospital

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